Valentina, 27, from Colombia, I'm a translator and ESL Teacher, I love food, dogs, cats, and commas.

fuckyeahlatinamericanhistory:

Yesterday’s Colombian Google doodle celebrated the 85th anniversary of the birth of Vallenato musician Rafael Escalona. The doodle alludes to his song “La casa en el aire” (“The house in the air”).

fuckyeahlatinamericanhistory:

Yesterday’s Colombian Google doodle celebrated the 85th anniversary of the birth of Vallenato musician Rafael Escalona. The doodle alludes to his song “La casa en el aire” (“The house in the air”).

fuckyeahlatinamericanhistory:

Today In Latin American History

Mexican film legend María Félix was born in the state of Sonora on April 8, 1914 and died on the same date 88 years later, on April 8, 2002.

DON’T MESS WITH “LA DOÑA”

fuckyeahlatinamericanhistory:

There are currently five female heads of state or heads of government in Latin America and the Caribbean:

  • Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, president of Argentina since 2007.
  • Laura Chinchilla, president of Costa Rica since 2010.
  • Kamla Persad-Bissessar, prime minister of Trinidad and Tobago since 2010.
  • Dilma Rousseff, president of Brazil since 2011.
  • Portia Simpson-Miller, prime minister of Jamaica since January 2012 (with a previous term in 2006-2007).

Y Colombia ni chimba !!

When Latin feminists within the AFD failed to do likewise, [Dr. Evangelina] Rodríguez acknowledged the needs of poor women and encouraged elite and aspiring Petromacorisanas to do the same. From 1925 until her death in 1947, Rodríguez worked tirelessly advocating for free health care for poor women and children living in San Pedro and its nearby rural districts. In the field, Rodríguez blended her medical and normalista training, teaching informal classes on basic hygiene and instructing midwives on ways to prevent infections during and after childbirth. She also established health clinics where she treated patients suffering from the endemic disease of poverty – tuberculosis and leprosy. She operated the Centre for the Protection of Maternity and Infancy from where she distributed milk donated by local farmers to poor women and children. Rodríguez and other female activists coaxed – sometimes aggressively prodded and shamed – San Pedro’s city council into funding a maternity hospital, which opened in 1929. Rodríguez even included ‘fallen women’ into her vision of public health when she dispensed free contraceptives to prostitutes whose venereal diseases she also treated, despite criticism from San Pedro’s public health establishment. That Rodríguez’s work influenced local elite and aspiring women is unquestioned: in 1929, for instance, San Pedro’s Feminine League courageously held a trinket sale in the central park to publicise their anti-syphilis campaign.

Thanks to Rodríguez’s leadership, activist women in San Pedro made important strides in providing healthcare to poor people. Rodríguez and other activist women also pushed Dominican feminist practice in potentially radical directions because their work directed attention to a larger system of inequality that oppressed poor women of colour on the basis of class, colour and gender. Rodríguez’s radical insight, perhaps a result of her training in Paris, was to understand the unequal distribution of healthcare as evidence that female subordination was a structural problem rooted in poverty, racism and political disenfranchisement. Rodríguez’s personal experiences also dramatically underscored this reality. Despite her brilliance as a doctor and social activist, locals often ridiculed Rodríguez as a ‘black’ and ‘ugly woman’ because she preferred braiding her hair and wearing Oxford shoes – as opposed to heels. Rodríguez reportedly surmised that, ‘because I don’t have a husband, a man to protect me, they accuse me of being a lesbian. I get poison pen letters under my door. Even in the street when I pass by, people throw insults at me’. Rodríguez’s activism, African heritage and her singleness positioned her much like the poor women she tended, as someone beyond the boundaries of acceptable, Dominican womanhood and the Latin Dominican nation.